NUTRIENT DICTIONARY


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Amino Acids
Building blocks that make up proteins like hormones, enzymes and proteins in all of the body's tissues and muscle. There are 8 essential amino acids (EAAs) that we need to get from food; the body can make the other 11. Three EAAs are categorized as branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) and are very importrant to have in your diet. When all EAAs are present, it is termed "complete protein."

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Anthocyanins
Powerful antioxidants that promote urinary tract health. We commonly get them from cranberries.

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Antioxidants
Antioxidants are agents that prevent damage to cells by inhibiting oxidation and by trapping free radicals. They affect the digestive system and nutrition due to their ability to stabilize fats and oils by delaying oxidation. There are numerous varieties of antioxidants found naturally occuring in plants and fruits. When they are cold processed, these heat-sensitive nutrients are maintained.

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Carotenoids
Highly colored (red, orange, and yellow) group of plant pigments that give plants and berries their color. Some carotenoids are converted in the body to vitamin A. The most well known of this group are beta-carotene and alpha-carotene.
Studies suggest that a higher dietary intake of carotenoids offers protection against developing certain cancers (e.g., lung, skin, uterine, cervix, gastrointestinal tract), macular degeneration, cataracts, and other health conditions linked to oxidative or free radical damage.

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Dietary Fiber
Lowers cholesterol and blood sugar levels, helps move waste through the intestines. Diets rich in plant fiber are related to a reduction of heart disease, colon cancer and diabetes.

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Vitamin E
Antioxidants that protect cell membranes, essential for red blood cells, aids cellular respiration and protects lung tisse from pollution. Commonly used for skin care, they affect every cell in the body.

There are 2 types: Tocopherols and Tocotrienols. Tocotrienols are known as "super vitamin-E" and can be 4x more powerful than tocopherols.

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Ellagic Acid
Ellagic Acid has become a known as a potent anti-carcinogenic/anti-mutagenic compound and also has anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties.

Ellagic acid acts as a scavenger to "bind" cancer-causing chemicals, making them inactive. It inhibits the ability of other chemicals to cause mutations in bacteria. In addition, ellagic acid from red raspberries prevents binding of carcinogens to DNA, and reduces the incidence of cancer in cultured human cells exposed to carcinogens.

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Minerals: Calcium and Potassium

Calcium
Supports bones, teeth, muscle tissue, regulates the heartbeat, muscle action, nerve function, blood clotting.

Potassium
Helps keep blood pressure down and aids muscle contractions, aids healthy electrical activity in the heart and rapid transmission of nerve impulses throughout the body.

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Omega-3 Essential Fatty Acids
Help protect the heart, help prevent stroke, lower cholesterol levels, effect neurological activity, improve brain function, reduce inflammation, improve skin conditions, and alleviate arthritis. The American diet severely lacks this essential nutrient due to traditional food processing practices. The three types most commonly referenced are ALA, EPA and DHA. ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) is the "mother of all Omega-3s." It is found from plant sources and is as a precursor for EPA and DHA, which are traditionally found in foods such as fish.

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Omega-6 Essential Fatty Acids
A group of EFAs that support a wide variety of bodily structures and are in abundance in the typical American diet. The imbalance of Omega-3 to Omega-6 may be the reason why we, as Americans, are experiencing so many of the "conditions of civilization." Omega-6 is a pro-inflammatory compound while Omega-3 shows an anti-inflammatory response. Research indicates a variety of health complications are due to the overabundance of this essential fatty acid. Ideally, a person needs a 1:1 ratio of Omega-3 to Omega-6 to properly utilize and metabolize these "healthy fats."

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Oleic Acid (Omega-9 Fatty Acid)
Oleic acid is a monosaturated fat generally believed to be good for one’s health. It is the chief fatty acid found in olive oil and is commonly used in Mediterranean cuisine.

Modern studies show many benefits of consuming olive oil, especially for maintaining cholesterol and heart health. Evidence suggests that oleic acid helps lower levels of harmful low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) in the bloodstream, while leaving levels of beneficial high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) unchanged. It is also found in significant quantities in canola, cod-liver, coconut, soybean, almond, cranberry, and other fruit oils.

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OPCs
Come from an extract from grape seeds which have a high content of compounds known as oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPCs). The OPCs are also present in a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, including pine bark (Pycnogenol) and green tea, where, like grape seed extract, they possess potent antioxidant properties.

Research on the chemical properties of grape seed extract has shown them to be powerful antioxidants, or free radical scavengers – even more potent than the more commonly used antioxidant vitamins like C and E.

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Phospholipids
Phospholipids are a source of essential fatty acids derived from plants and fruits. They support your circulation, liver function and general sense of well-being.

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Phytosterols
Phytosterols (aka plant sterols) are plant compounds with chemical structures similar to that of cholesterol. Because of this similarity, they can actually block food-based cholesterol from being absorbed into the bloodstream.

Because of their ability to block dietary cholesterol absorption, phytosterols can help lower your cholesterol levels and aid in preventing heart disease.

In the last few years, clinical research has also discovered other effects, including reducing symptoms of an enlarged prostate, improving the control of blood sugar among people with diabetes, and reducing inflammation among patients with autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus.

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To see how many of these nutrients are used in nutritional products, visit the Fruit Essentials® website:

www.FruitEssentials.com

 
 

Disclaimer: The science and any claims made about the products on this site have not been evaluated by Food and Drug Administration and are not approved to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease or medical condition. As always, consult with your healthcare professional before starting any diet, medication or dietary supplement.

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